Firdaus Rahman Shares The Most Defining Moments In His Acting Career

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His often plays a man in uniform in television dramas, captivating audiences for more than ten years. However, it was Firdaus Rahman’s most recent starring role as correctional officer Aiman in Boo Junfeng’s The Apprentice, which propelled his career to new heights, with the movie showing at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. Since then, the 36-year-old father of two has returned to the stage where it all began. He plays the lead in Prism, a cold-hearted housing official laden tasked with evicting thousands from their homes and also, from their history, culture and lives. We speak to the suave actor who tells us about the crucial moments in his decade-long career:

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HOW DID YOUR ACTING CAREER BEGIN?

Firdaus: By chance, 16 years ago. I was in school and saw an audition call for a Malay play, and even though I had no formal training, something in me was yearning to just try it out. That set me on an inspired path for a career in theatre, before expanding into television soon after. I’ve been very fortunate.

YOU WON JUARA, A TALENT COMPETITION HOSTED BY MEDIACORP’S SURIA IN 2002. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR BREAKOUT ROLE SINCE?

F: I’ve played a number of truly diverse characters, but it was my role as Johan in Malaysian drama, Ramadan Jangan Pergi in 2014 that has made me who I am today. Having to engage and impress a brand new audience — which was much, much bigger than I was used to — pushed my limits as an actor, and gave me the opportunity to work and learn alongside established actors and producers from across the Causeway.

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WHAT’S BEEN THE DEFINING MOMENT OF YOUR CAREER SO FAR?

F: Without a doubt, playing Aiman in The Apprentice — not only is it my first film, I got to play the lead, it premiered at Cannes, and got me a nomination for Best Newcomer at the Asian Film Awards. The first time I saw the movie, I cried. It was surreal and incredibly humbling, and the eight-minute standing ovation was one of the most moving experiences of my life.

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Story originally appeared on Harper's Bazaar Singapore.

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